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Bloomington approves "Managed competition," gives Hales raise

Tue, 23 Apr 2013 09:20:35 CDT
By: Rachel Darling

Bloomington approves Last night's Council meeting addressed what Mayor Steve Stockton called "a cloud over our employees" at last night's meeting. Mayor Stockton says the managed competition policy created by City Manager David Hales has been "incorrectly labeled a recipe for outsourcing"...

   

"What we really want to do with this is something that we think our tax payers and voters expect us to do --and that is to spend their dollars responsibly. Now does that mean it has to be spent with contractors? No."

He says that the policy implies the need for "partnership" and "trust." Alderman Judy Stearns says the policy "has hurt city morale." Alderman Mboka Mwilambwe expressed concern about the terms "Managed Competition" and "partnership" in the policy...

   

"Both are being used back and forth and that lends itself lead to confusion."

Alderman Mwilambwe says the term "Managed Competition" implies there are "winners and losers." Alderman Jennifer McDade says "big ideas" are expressed by the policy, but the Council should not be bound by it...

   

"The bottom line is: it's not going to create trust, its not going to create empowerment, it's not going to lead us down the path to innovation."

Alderman Robert Fazzini says the policy "is about efficiency." The motion passed, with Alderman McDade and Stearns abstaining.

Last night's meeting also saw the approval of a four-year contract including a $21,000 dollar raise for City Manager David Hales after much discussion at last night's meeting. Mayor Steve Stockton called Hales' work "exceptional." Stockton says Hales has not received a raise in four years...

   

"Now the City Manager's salary has not been increased since he was hired in 2009, at a salary level of $150,000 dollars, other employees have, in fact, been given annual consideration."

Hales' salary has increased to $171,000 dollars, a 14% increase that breaks down to 3.5% a year for the past four years. Alderman David Osage highlighted savings Hales' efforts created for the city.
Alderman Judy Stearns says the increase and its timing before the newly elected council and mayor can act is "troubling" and "ill thought out." The ordinance passed almost unanimously with Alderman Stearns abstaining.
   

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