GLT's Grow

From controlling critters to whacking weeds to finding just the right plant for your plot, GLT's Grow is your source for sage gardening advice and down-to-earth tips. Host Patrick Murphy and co-host Laura Kennedy are ready to take on all your gardening questions, so submit yours today. Let GLT help your garden Grow!

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Stress is not only bad for humans. It can have a negative impact on your trees as well.

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When the heat is on and the rains are not, lawns can shut down. But does dormancy mean death for your grass?

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Impatiens downy mildew is a growing problem in gardens across America. Defoliation and flower dropping are two signs your plants are infected.

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Karen in Normal bid farewell to a massive old maple tree on the west end of her house.  Now that all remains is a stump, she wants to select something new.

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Here's a nasty relative of the tick that you don't want in your yard: the spider mite. It's hard to fight a battle against something you can barely see!

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There's increasing evidence that many pollinators are on the decline, but a few changes in your yard can help pollinators not only survive, but thrive.

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You call it a garden. The cat calls it the bathroom. Can they safely be both?

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Sometimes you just want to plant a huckleberry bush in your yard. And sometimes it's just a pain trying to actually find a huckleberry bush. Finding native plants can be a challenge.

The jumping worm and the gypsy moth are two pests you need to keep an eye out for -- they're bad news for plants and gardeners.

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What better way to enhance movie night than with a big bowl of  your own home-grown popcorn!

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The huge flower heads of the hydrangea bring a burst of color—pink, blue, lavender—to your garden.

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Sure, you could go to the grocery store to buy fruits to bake into a lovely pie or tart.  But wouldn't it be more satisfying to grow your own fruits for your baking needs?

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Clubroot is a serious problem in gardens, with broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower vulnerable to its attack.

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The most popular backyard crop for gardeners is the luscious strawberry. Host Patrick Murphy has some advice.

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Don't put those trimmed brush and dried leaves at the curb.  You can repurpose them in your yard to make it a healthier place.

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If you want your yard to thrive, you need to add plants that are hardy for your particular zone.  But can you actually fudge the rules of the zones?

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Gardening is a popular hobby and loads of fun, but beware!  Danger lurks behind every shrub and tree!

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Now's the time to start growing potatoes in your garden.  But don't limit yourself to the usual potato suspects.

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The serious fungal disease, boxwood blight, has been detected in Illinois, putting thousands of boxwoods plants in danger.

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Not every yard is all grass and plants.  Hardscaping is often an important part of the landscaping equation.

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When planning your yard, it's best to keep in mind you pets and how they will use the space.  Doing so will keep you both happy -- and your pets healthy.

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With spring looming, gardeners can get a leg up on their work outside by starting inside—starting seeds inside, that is.

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Sometimes the nature that shows up in our backyard is beautiful, but uninvited.  Wildlife can set up shop on your property, and it's best if you know how to handle your uninvited guests.

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Got something in your yard you want to hide, like those unsightly, but oh-so-important utility boxes?  Patrick Murphy, host of GLT's Grow, has some advice for you.

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Sporting a brown, rather than green, thumb?  Looking for a fun plant that's easy to grow?  Then give Tillandsia a try!

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Out of all the things you can grow in soil, mold is probably one of the least welcome -- right down there with crabgrass and dandelions.  While there are some nasty molds that do damage, there are actually some molds you should encourage.

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Winter has quite the arsenal it can throw at us -- and our yards, noted  Patrick Murphy, host of GLT's Grow.  But understanding the full wrath of winter weather can help us treat, and possibly, prevent damage.

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No sense in pining away for spring.  According to Patrick Murphy, host of GLT's Grow, you can get planting right now to enjoy from fresh, delicious produce grown by your own hand.

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Gardeners are trapped inside for the winter, and Patrick Murphy, host of GLT's Grow understands that desire to be out in the yard growing things.

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Beautiful, flowering plants like poinsettias are very popular this time of year.  But what about other times of year?  Patrick Murphy, host of GLT's Grow, has advice on keeping those holiday plants going well into the new year.

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