Gardening | WGLT

Gardening

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As the days get cooler and shorter, nature puts on a gorgeous display of color as the leaves change—red, yellow, orange and, yes, even brown.

Judith Valente / WGLT

There are some new faces in the prairies around McLean County—ceramic faces, that is.

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There's an exciting new trend in gardening that's as beautiful as it is delicious.

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It's fun adding decor to our gardens. But go too far and you'll end up in tacky territory.

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Ponds on our property can add beauty and value. They can also add to our to-do list.

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Right now is a great time to prepare our yards for the wildlife that will stop by in the snowy months ahead.

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Fall brings us the opportunity to enjoy milder weather, which makes working in the yard that much more fun!

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One of the joys of summer is biting into fresh melon. It can taste better still when you grow the melon yourself. Patrick Murphy has some advice.

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Trees are a beautiful and practical way to screen your property from the wind.

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Summer is slowly winding down, and with the approach of autumn it's time to make plans to transplant trees and shrubs in your yard. Host Patrick Murphy has this advice.

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You can add some serious beauty to your yard and not have to worry about watering or fertilizing.

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White pines in America are vulnerable to several diseases.

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For every iris, lily or rose that you plant in your garden, you put out a welcome mat for bunnies and other critters to come and dine at the leisure.

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Stress is not only bad for humans. It can have a negative impact on your trees as well.

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When the heat is on and the rains are not, lawns can shut down. But does dormancy mean death for your grass?

impatiens flowers
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Impatiens downy mildew is a growing problem in gardens across America. Defoliation and flower dropping are two signs your plants are infected.

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Karen in Normal bid farewell to a massive old maple tree on the west end of her house.  Now that all remains is a stump, she wants to select something new.

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Here's a nasty relative of the tick that you don't want in your yard: the spider mite. It's hard to fight a battle against something you can barely see!

Wikimedia Commons

There's increasing evidence that many pollinators are on the decline, but a few changes in your yard can help pollinators not only survive, but thrive.

Judith Valente / GLT News

People who garden often say there is more to it than putting plants and flowers in the ground.  They feel a sense of serenity and well-being from getting their hands in the soil, from being outdoors and helping a living thing grow.

On Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., the University of Illinois Extension office and the McLean County Master Gardeners will offer a Horticultural Therapy Workshop at the Community Cancer Center in Normal. Its message: gardening can be healing.

MaxiPixel

You call it a garden. The cat calls it the bathroom. Can they safely be both?

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Sometimes you just want to plant a huckleberry bush in your yard. And sometimes it's just a pain trying to actually find a huckleberry bush. Finding native plants can be a challenge.

The jumping worm and the gypsy moth are two pests you need to keep an eye out for -- they're bad news for plants and gardeners.

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What better way to enhance movie night than with a big bowl of  your own home-grown popcorn!

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The huge flower heads of the hydrangea bring a burst of color—pink, blue, lavender—to your garden.

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Sure, you could go to the grocery store to buy fruits to bake into a lovely pie or tart.  But wouldn't it be more satisfying to grow your own fruits for your baking needs?

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Clubroot is a serious problem in gardens, with broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower vulnerable to its attack.

Colleen Connelly

It's time once again for community gardeners to begin planting.

The West Bloomington Active Garden has added 12 news beds this season for residents to plant for free, making for a total of 32 plots.

However, all of those plots are already spoken for. Colleen Connelly, who oversees the garden, says there will be a waiting list. Connelly says she's not surprised by the interest the gardens have generated.

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The most popular backyard crop for gardeners is the luscious strawberry. Host Patrick Murphy has some advice.

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Don't put those trimmed brush and dried leaves at the curb.  You can repurpose them in your yard to make it a healthier place.

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