GLT's Sound Ideas

Weekdays 12PM and 6PM

GLT's Sound Ideas is newsmakers.  It's gardening, science, the arts, and a central Illinois music calendar.  It's pet care, blues, poetry, and jazz.  It's the sounds of your life and your places.  And there's room for your opinion when the phone lines are open.  This hour-long radio news magazine is produced Monday through Friday.

Jose Marti: Why He Matters

Sep 28, 2015
University of Texas Press

One of the most influential men in the western hemisphere is poorly understood by many, including those who grew up in his shadows. WGLT's Jim Browne talks an author (Alfred Lopez), who's finally written a biography of the contemporary of Abraham Lincoln.

Alfred Lopez' appearance was facilitated by Illinois State University's Latin American and Latino/Latina studies program

Compass Records

Everybody in Nashville recognizes the name of fiddle virtuoso and singer Andrea Zonn. A native of Champaign/Urbana, she's backed up George Jones, George Strait, Vince Gill, Lyle Lovett, and for the last 12 years has been a member of James Taylor's band. This month, she's released her second solo CD, "Rise." It features a stellar cadre of singers like Gill and Taylor, and a set of songs catalyzed by the medical travails of Zonn's son Leonard. GLT's Bruce Bergethon spoke with Zonn about the new release.

Excitement is still building as the visit of Pope Francis to the U.S. continues with a mass in Philadelphia tomorrow. GLT's Judy Valente is on the way to Philadelphia with a group of Catholics from Central Illinois. The trip began with the rising of the moon over Roanoke, Illinois. Valente tells us they are tired and excited after traveling all night. There are ten in a van for twelve and she says they saw the sun rise in Pennsylvania this morning.

Experimental fiction is emerging from the thickets of post modernism. ISU English Professor Chris Breu has a new book out addressing this shift, Insistence of the Material. In this conversation with GLT's Charlie Schlenker, Breu argues for the value of attending to the material world and how that physical world sets limits on social and individual life.

As the Normal Sesquicentennial celebration kicks off, GLT begins a series of interviews with the people who are offering lectures as part of Normal 150 events. Today, the topic is the early years of Normal. GLT's Charlie Schlenker talks with retired ISU Historian Paul Holsinger and asks why Normal was a good place for settlement in the first place. Holsinger says the answer was not obvious.

John Alltop / Wikimedia Commons

The Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Children's Home was a fixture in Normal for 110 years. As the community celebrates its 150th anniversary, Ruthie Cobb chats with Charlie Schlenker about the orphanage. She's says the home had a singular statewide impact as well as a local one.

GLT aired Charlie's feature on a book put out by the ISSCS Historical Society in 2007.

 

William Wesen / Wikimedia Commons

In  the development of Normal, transportation has been a key theme. WGLT's Charlie Schlenker is interviewing all of the lecturers for the "Normal 150" celebration.  Terry Ryburn and Mike Matejka share their thoughts on why Normal developed the way it did.

Esther Bubley / Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

As the Town of Normal observes its sesquicentennial, there are things in its history that should be recognized but not celebrated. In our continuing series of "Normal 150" interviews, GLT's Charlie Schlenker talks with a retired ISU historian about racial segregation. Mark Wyman says the division of whites and blacks in Normal was similar to other cities in Illinois.

 

Photo: Bryan Murphy

  Bryan in La Grange, Illinois has a hibiscus plant that's not thriving and hopes host Patrick Murphy can solve the problem.

Mark Nybakke

Organizer Mark Nybakke talks about the upcoming Bloomington/Normal Zombie Walk, including what pudding and a crossbow have to do with the fundraiser.

Laura Kennedy / WGLT

For some, the body is a temple.  For other, it's a canvas...a way to express a unique point of view.  A new exhibit at Illinois State University's Milner Library explores the various ways people can express themselves with tattoos and piercings, and how body art has gone from the underground to mainstream.

Occasionally we send Jon Norton out to local record stores to listen to what customers are hearing as they browse the bins.  Norton's trip to Uptown Normal this week pumped some new heavy metal in his hear holes.

The clock is ticking down on the number of days left to visit one of the foremost Native American archeological sites in the U.S. The Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown, IL is scheduled to close under Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed budget cuts. Archeologist Alan Harn has spent the past 53 years studying the Native American human remains and artifacts there for clues about these early settlers.

The Guardian

Rhiannon Giddens performed at Bloomington's Castle Theatre on September 18th. She's touring behind her new CD, "Tomorrow is My Turn," produced by T Bone Burnett. Giddens is the co-founder of The Carolina Chocolate Drops. Her first solo CD is a convincing collection of diverse American styles, from country to gospel to blues. From her home in southern Ireland, Giddens spoke with GLT's Bruce Bergethon.

The Jan Brandt Gallery in Bloomington celebrates National Hispanic Heritage month by displaying works by Mexican-American artists.  During the installation of some of those works, Laura Kennedy spoke with an artist whose prints and sculptures have been inspired by recent tragic events in Mexico...

Mike McCurdy / WGLT

The community budget task force has presented its final recommendations to Aldermen and the community. Aldermen also took action on one of the funding recommendations in the task force presentation - a one-percent sales tax increase. WGLT's Mike McCurdy talked with two members of the task force during Sound Ideas.

Adler Planetarium

Riding a bicycle from Chicago to St. Louis is a long ways on a bike. But it’s no comparison to the vast distances in the galaxy or universe, distances measured in light years or the distance light travels in a year. Dr. Lucianne Walkowicz is an astronomer with Chicago’s Adler Planetarium and a TED Senior Fellow. She’s also in the middle of a 300 mile bike ride, designed to bring some perspective to the universe.

Marriage for same-sex couples is now the law of the land. While it took effect in Illinois in 2014, the United States Supreme Court made it available across the country earlier this year. So what's next in the push for rights in the LGBT community? That's a question I posed at a recent conference in Springfield:

Exploring Mental Illness Through Photography

Sep 20, 2015

A young artist is hoping to challenge preconceived ideas about mental illness in her latest work.  Laura Kennedy walked through the exhibit at the Rachel Cooper Gallery at Illinois State University.

 

 

Photo courtesy Flickr user James Petts via Creative Commons

There's danger afoot in the garden!  Host Patrick Murphy talks about some noxious plants to avoid.

Photo courtesy Flickr user Jasleen Kaur via Creative Commons

  When our plants experience too much rain in the spring, it can be bad news all summer long.  Host Patrick Murphy grosses out sidekick Laura Kennedy with an explanation of what he calls 'plant snot.'

Photo courtesy Flickr user fish hawk via Creative Commons

Host Patrick Murphy has an appreciation for farmers, plus some canning advice.

David Davis Mansion Foundation

  David Davis is 200! Hear about the party to celebrate Judge Davis, plus how the David Davis Mansion is holding the fort in tough economic times.

  Get a preview of "Noises Off," the new show at Community Players in Bloomington.

 

Artist Brian Simpson talks about the new thing in art collecting:  3x5 artist cards.

  Listen up!  Dr. Matt Fraker talks about the most common ear issues that can impact our pets.

  

  Dr. Tim Anderson talks about the dangers of summer heat for our pets.

Photo: Flickr user Patti via Creative Commons

Get some pet grooming tips from the pros in this episode of Animal House.

Brad Basham Photography / www.bbasham.com & Town of Normal

The Town of Normal is following its twin to the south and developing a new comprehensive plan. The plan, when finished, will guide the Town for the next two decades. The City adopted its plan, guided by the McLean County Regional Planning Commission, earlier this year. And the Town of Normal plan won’t be adopted until late 2016, leaving plenty of time for community and citizen input.

Courtesy of Lendingmemo.com via CreativeCommons.org

Many equate putting money into the stock market with gambling. There are many similarities, especially when the market is as volatile as it's been lately. But there are even more similarities than you probably would have ever imagined. Willis Kern has more during Sound Money.

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