GLT's Sound Ideas | WGLT

GLT's Sound Ideas

Weekdays 12 p.m. and 6 p.m.

GLT's Sound Ideas is newsmakers. It's gardening, science, the arts, and a central Illinois music calendar. It's pet care, blues, poetry, and jazz. It's the sounds of your life and your places. And there's room for your opinion when the phone lines are open. This hour-long radio news magazine is produced Monday through Friday.

Gar Knight / Flickr via Creative Commons

The wind has two faces. It can be a friend or it can be a bitter foe.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

For some children of Indian workers in Bloomington-Normal, the future is uncertain at best.

A mechanical gadget sitting on a desk that is about the size of a desktop printer.  It is a mass spectrometer that can identify illegal drugs at crime scenes.
Photo courtesy of Illinois State University

Police officers face some scary, illicit drugs when responding to crime scenes, including synthetic painkillers where contact with even the smallest amount can be fatal. That was a concern, in hindsight, after emergency responders found an overdose victim in Bloomington who used heroin mixed with deadly carfentanyl, which can be easily absorbed on contact.

Laura Kennedy / WGLT

"An educator today who had me in their classroom, I think, would be pretty worried."

Judith Valente / WGLT

There have been a number of changes at the McLean County Circuit Court, including revisions to drug laws and the bond-setting structure, aimed at keeping low-level offenders out of jail. Earlier this month, the court established a new, mandatory electronic filing system.

Sophia Tareen / AP

Illinois attorney general hopeful Erika Harold said she wants to increase efforts to stop public corruption while simultaneously staying away from partisan politics—a difficult balancing act for a Republican office holder in a blue state.

The Bloomington Center of Performing Arts has been without a permanent manager since March 2017. But that will soon change.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

Dr. Ramsin Benyamin views the opioid epidemic almost like he would a patient. If you ask Benyamin how he’d fix the opioid issue—how he’d treat it—he starts with a diagnosis.

Bobby Norfolk

Storytelling and loving to hear a story is just in our blood. That's according to a storyteller that's coming to the Bloomington Public Library.

Ken Lam

You might think a piece of classical music composed about a symposium on different philosophers would not be terribly romantic. You'd be wrong.

Anton Vakulenko / Flickr via Creative Commons

The icy embrace of winter can be brutal, but it's a necessary part of garden life.


The Feudin’ Hillbillys. It's a name that conjures both a kind of music and an attitude.

Charlie Schlenker / WGLT

The McLean County Board is forming an advisory committee in response to a request for proposal to analyze operations of the county’s nursing home.

Carleigh Gray / WGLT

A Democratic candidate for governor and part-time farmer wants Illinois to ban the use of a controversial herbicide that’s damaged crops all over the Midwest.

Tom Becker library

Tom Becker graduated from Stanford (IL) High School. That alone will date him.

AP/Jon Chase

Bloomington-Normal has a gap in services to the dying. It has no residential hospice facility where people can receive 24-hour care at the end of life. Kevin Moore wants to change that.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

Pamela Reece was named the Town of Normal’s next city manager on Tuesday, becoming just the third person to serve in that job and the first woman to hold the position in either Twin City local governments.

Illinois Wesleyan University Athletics

When Illinois Wesleyan head women's soccer coach Dave Barrett accepted the same job at Division 1 Fairfield University in Connecticut last week, he said the opportunity was a perfect storm.

Staff / WGLT

UPDATED 2:45 p.m. | Bloomington Mayor Tari Renner said Tuesday he was “hugely skeptical” of privatizing garbage collection, a move some aldermen think would help close the city’s looming $3 million budget deficit.

Google Earth

When Illinois State athletic officials started the second phase of their long-term planning four years ago and took a comprehensive look at the facilities, there was little doubt what was at the top of the list.

LM Otero / AP

When a big local retailer like JCPenney or Gordmans closes its doors, it becomes another chapter in the “retail apocalypse” storyline that predicts the end of brick-and-mortar shopping.

Associated Press

Calling themselves the "Bloomington-Normal Resistance," dozens of local women are planning to take to the streets at this Saturday's March to the Polls in Chicago.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

A local brewery’s new taproom in south Bloomington is the latest addition to Central Illinois' growing craft-beer scene.

Lorie Shaull / Flickr via Creative Commons

Two Normal Community High School juniors are organizing a benefit concert for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico and learning the benefits of civic engagement.

Coconine National Forest / Flickr via Creative Commons

There are lots of reasons why we have to cut down trees. Understanding those reasons can help us face the cruelest cut.

Ramon Espinosa / AP

Nearly five months after a Category 5 hurricane rampaged through Puerto Rico, most residents still lack electricity and face shortages of health care items and basic necessities, according to Bloomington-Normal residents who have relatives on the island.

Cindy Le / WGLT

Normal leaders are moving ahead with plans for a new five-story building on the northeast arc of Uptown circle, the next step in a dramatic reshaping of the town’s central business district.

Ryan Denham / WGLT

If President Donald Trump has taught us anything, it’s that the way you communicate your political beliefs matters more than ever.

Kevin Schertz

What would life be without music for Chris Corkery?

“I can’t … ” said Corkery softly, pausing to consider the implications. “Wow … good question. It’s hard for me to even conceptualize that. Music … saved my life in a lot of ways for many years.”

Jon Norton / WGLT

McLean County Museum of History Librarian Bill Kemp's new book is his second collection of stories written for The Pantagraph. The 77 stories in this edition reveal issues from the county's past that still reverberate today, albeit in different form.