GLT's Sound Ideas

Weekdays 12PM and 6PM

GLT's Sound Ideas is newsmakers.  It's gardening, science, the arts, and a central Illinois music calendar.  It's pet care, blues, poetry, and jazz.  It's the sounds of your life and your places.  And there's room for your opinion when the phone lines are open.  This hour-long radio news magazine is produced Monday through Friday.

City of Bloomington / Smith Group, JJR

Parking lots in the northeast part of Downtown Bloomington purchased by the city may not remain as parking lots for long. 

"The Frontier lots are critical and they're critical to economic development and frankly, from the stand point of the city, control over the property," said Mayor Tari Renner during Sound Ideas. "We're finding, obviously with the Front 'n' Center building, if you don't have control of the property there are limitations in how you can operate." 

Henri Huet / AP

Harvard University Professor Fredrik Logevall was a child living in Canada when the United States pulled its combat forces from Vietnam in 1973.  Later, as an expert in international affairs, Logevall said he considered it crucial to understand this complicated and controversial part of American history. 

James Chiucci / Flickr via Creative Commons

A mysterious fungal disease is impacting wild and captive snakes in at least 15 states.

Illinois Wesleyan University

There were few books in Cornelius Eady's household when he was growing up in Rochester, New York.

"We barely had a radio," he recalled on GLT's Sound Ideas.

The local library was his sanctuary, a "serene, welcoming place that let you wander around. It was clean, quiet. There was no chaos about it."

Eady said he scoured the library's set of encyclopedias Britannica, reading about everything from nuclear energy to the habits of squirrels. Then some lyrics he had written were published in his high school literary magazine, "and people started calling me a poet ... I didn't know what that meant."

Charles Osgood Photography

Renee Rosen's new historical novel "Windy City Blues" uses Chicago and its storied blues history as a backdrop to a story about perseverance and coming of age.

"I sort of see it as the story of three people who come to Chicago seeking a better life," said Rosen via Skype from her Chicago home.

Cristian Jaramillo / WGLT

The future of Planned Parenthood across Illinois is far from certain. But its services don't appear to be under immediate threat from a recent directive from President Trump.

That measure would allow state and local governments to withhold Title X family planning funds from health facilities that also provide abortion services.

McLean County's sole Planned Parenthood clinic would not be affected because it doesn't perform abortions. Additionally,  all Planned Parenthood clinics statewide receive Title X funds as a direct grantee of the federal government and not through the state, said Julie Lynn of Planned Parenthood of Illinois. 

However, women's reproductive services, especially for low income residents, remain a target of many federal and state officials, Lynn said.

Ralph Weisheit / WGLT

Pretrial skirmishing among attorneys is important for any criminal trial.

It helps set the ground rules for the courtroom conflict between prosecution and defense.

GLT Sound Ideas 04/24/17

Apr 24, 2017

U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth took some risks during a town hall style meeting at Illinois Wesleyan University. She told a largely progressive crowd they should not immediately work toward a single payer healthcare system and that a public option on insurance exchanges is, perhaps, more achievable. The Illinois Democrat also told the crowd that certain GOP proposals for healthcare reform are red herrings and traps. She said those include: making birth control over the counter instead of by prescription which would allow insurance companies to avoid paying for it, and the Republican definition of pre-existing conditions. She said putting people with medical conditions into high risk pools would price them out of insurance .

Christian Jaramillo / WGLT

The advocacy group Black Lives Matter BloNo has been asking the Bloomington Police Department to adopt "Community Policing" rather than what it characterizes as a "Broken Windows" approach to policing. Broken Windows theory argues that focusing on small crimes such as vandalism and toll-jumping helps create an atmosphere of order and lawfulness, which leads to less serious crimes being committed.
 

D Allen / Flickr via Creative Commons

Runners, cyclists, swimmers and more can find support and comradeship  at the Central Illinois MultiSport Expo in Normal.

Lesley L. / Flickr via Creative Commons

Clubroot is a serious problem in gardens, with broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower vulnerable to its attack.

Jon Norton / WGLT

Dr. Cara Rabe-Hemp of Illinois State University's Department of Criminal Justice said there is little debate about what constitutes "community policing." The general idea is that citizens take an active role in co-producing crime control with law enforcement. How police have transferred that philosophy into strategies and tactics is where the debate continues. 

GLT News

At a public forum last December sponsored by Black Lives Matter, several residents of the Bloomington's west side complained that their neighborhood is under a police microscope, with officers making unfair stops and arrests.

Bloomington Police Chief Brendan Heffner says  he sends additional patrols to areas of the city that have a higher rate of incidents. 

The practice is a  common one known as "hot spot policing."  It is used by departments across America in cities both large and small to address high crime areas. But does hot spot policing work?

Vladimir Kulenovic

One of America's greatest classical music composers is George Gershwin.

The Illinois Symphony Orchestra plays an entire Gershwin concert Friday at  the BCPA in Bloomington.

Staff / WGLT

District 87 Schools are planning a fine arts addition to Bloomington High School.

This will allow construction of a new band room, renovation of the old band room into the new orchestra room, refresh the chorus room, and create a kind of fine arts annex, since the drama area and the auditorium are nearby.

Flickr

There's and old joke that goes like this: a prison guard asks an inmate what he's in for. "Talking," the inmate replies.

Law Professor James Duane says it's no laughing matter.  He's the author of the book "You Have The Right To Remain Innocent" and is featured in a video titled "Don't Talk to the Cops" that's garnered thousands of views on You Tube.

Duane says innocent people sometimes get convicted based on information they provide to police in an effort to be cooperative.

Mark Featherly

St. Louis University associate professor of psychology Dr. Kira Hudson-Banks says one argument for being inclusive in a workplace is a moral one. It's the right thing to do. But being inclusive also has a bottom line argument.

Cristian Jaramillo / WGLT

The walkable downtown of the past isn't an anachronism, it's a future model for economic development.

Colleen Connelly

It's time once again for community gardeners to begin planting.

The West Bloomington Active Garden has added 12 news beds this season for residents to plant for free, making for a total of 32 plots.

However, all of those plots are already spoken for. Colleen Connelly, who oversees the garden, says there will be a waiting list. Connelly says she's not surprised by the interest the gardens have generated.

California Cow / Flickr via Creative Commons

An Illinois State University professor's research has earned her an invitation to join a task force that is taking on the music industry.

Mehmet Pinarci / Flickr via Creative Commons

The struggles against sexism in the world of science is at the core of the latest production on stage at Heartland Theater in Normal.

Judith Valente

At a bank of desks near an arched window streaming sunlight, a farmer does Internet research on one of the computers at the Carlock Public Library. Another patron reads the newspaper in one of the newly- remodeled reading areas. The scent of fresh woodwork and new carpeting fills the room.

These days, many public libraries face cutbacks in funding or even closure. That's not the case in the small farming community of Carlock,  population 569, near the border of McLean and Woodford counties. 

JamiehamelSmith / Flickr via Creative Commons

The most popular backyard crop for gardeners is the luscious strawberry. Host Patrick Murphy has some advice.

Laura Kennedy / WGLT

The McLean County Museum of History explores local agriculture history in their newest exhibition.

Cristian Jaramillo / WGLT

The changing nature of retail is affecting cities' ability to provide basic services. As an increasing number of people discover the convenience of online shopping, cities are losing essential sales tax revenue, something internet sellers don't pay.

Ron Frazier / Flickr

The Agriculture sector is among many U.S. interest groups carefully watching and weighing the young Trump administration in Washington. Candidate Trump staked out ground on the North American Free Trade Agreement that could harm Ag producers.

Illinois Farm Bureau Vice President David Erickson Erickson farms  3,400 acres in Knox and Henry Counties near Altona.

Unit 5 district offices
Staff / WGLT

The head of the Unit Five School District says he is pushing the panic button firmly about state aid payments. Speaking during GLT's Sound Ideas, Superintendent Mark Daniel said the district will run out of money about the end of the spring legislative session.

"We will not be able to have a balanced budget. So we will be in deficit spending: My great concern is if there is no state budget then how are they going to make payments in the future," said Daniel.

"Whenever I call it a jazz band I do air quotes. 'Jazz.'" said Disorganizer mandolin player Stefen Robinson, gesturing with the index and middle fingers of both hands over his head.

Why?

"Because I don't even know what that means anymore," continued Robinson. "Are you talking about Miles Davis? Are you talking about Wayne Shorter? Are you talking about Kneebody?

Staff / WGLT

Republicans in Springfield voted against the so-called 'lifeline' budget that cleared the Illinois House house last week.

The plan appropriates $815 million for things like homeless services, domestic violence programs, and MAP grants for low-income college students. One of those voting against the lifeline plan was Bloomington Republican Dan Brady.

Staff / WGLT

A proposed east-side Bloomington sewer project is contrasting the issue of suburban sprawl with the city's own 2015 comprehensive plan, which focuses on infill development.

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