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Just How Sweet Is The Taste Of Victory?

Sep 6, 2015

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Why Google Is Going All In On Diabetes

Sep 6, 2015

Millions of people with diabetes prick a finger more than five times a day to monitor their blood glucose levels. It's a painful and expensive process.

But now, Google's Life Sciences division is putting its immense resources behind new initiatives aimed at helping them better live with the disease.

"It's really hard for people to manage their blood sugar," said Jacquelyn Miller, a Google Life Sciences spokeswoman, in an interview with KQED. "We're hoping to take some of the guesswork out of it."

In 2010, photographer Gabriela Maj was working on a project about an artist in Afghanistan when one of her editors suggested she take a look at Afghan women's prisons. Maj recalls: "He said, you know there are all these stories kind of floating, kind of bubbling up in the international media about women being incarcerated for something known as 'moral crimes.' And they're being put into these prisons with their kids.'"

Jeb Bush likes to tell audiences that he's his own man. It's a way to put distance between himself and the two members of the Bush family who've already won the White House.

Thousands of migrants, many fleeing war and poverty in Syria and Iraq, are traveling through Hungary to Austria and Germany. European leaders are struggling to cope with the humanitarian crisis. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Magdalena Majkowska-Tomkin of the International Organization for Migration.

Updated Nov. 5, 2:50 p.m. ET: The authors of this study have retracted it, saying that they made errors in how they conducted the experiment and interpreted their data.

"We remain confident in the proposition that sadness impairs color perception, but would like to acquire clearer evidence before publishing this conclusion in a journal the caliber of Psychological Science."

The editor of the journal added:

Authorities in Thailand now say that neither of the two people in custody in connection with last month's deadly bombing of a religious shrine in the capital is the main suspect in the attack.

A couple hundred people gathered for a rally to free Kim Davis on Saturday in front of the Carter County Detention Center.

The Rowan, Ky., County clerk has spent three days there because she has defied the Supreme Court and refused to issue gay marriage licenses.

The protesters assembled in a field under a blazing summer sun.

Alan Hoyle, 54, stood near the stage and flew an American flag upside down.

Investigators in Pullman, Washington, have determined that a fire at a Planned Parenthood clinic in the city was intentionally set.

The three-year-old clinic, the scene of a major anti-abortion demonstration last month, is considered structurally unsafe following the blaze that occurred around 3:30 a.m. Friday.

No one was hurt.

The Spokesman-Review reports:

Businesses strive to be more efficient.  Often, that comes at the expense of jobs.  But Peter Wenz sees a way all can benefit. 

In his book Functional Inefficiency, he examines how some of the most labor-intensive sectors also are inefficient.  But they employ people and, in turn, help the overall economy.

We talked more with the author, who is also a Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois Springfield.

The U.S. Coast Guard is continuing efforts to clean up an oil spill along a stretch of the Mississippi River near Columbus, Ky., after two tow boats — one carrying about 1 million gallons of a potentially toxic petroleum product — collided earlier this week.

Supporters of Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, are planning a demonstration to voice their opposition to her incarceration.

"The Kim Davis Jailhouse Prayer Rally" is set to begin at 11 a.m. today at the Carter County Detention Center. An announcement for the rally, published by Christian News Wire, contends that Davis "is obeying the laws of Kentucky while refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex [couples]."

At first it seems lively outside on the weekend in Baghdad — the lights are bright in open-air cafes, music streams from beribboned cars in a wedding party and at Ali Hussein's juice stand, decorated with plastic bananas, they're squeezing oranges on old brass presses.

But even as Hussein offers me a sharp, fresh juice, he's downcast. When I ask about the subject on everyone's mind here — the migrant flood into Europe — he laughs. "We were just talking about this!" he says. Several of his friends just passed by to say farewell.

Congress Faces A Crazy-Busy September

Sep 5, 2015

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More than four years after the 7,400 residents of the Japanese town of Naraha were evacuated after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant melted down in the wake of a devastating tsunami, the government is allowing people to return.

Following several years of decontamination, Naraha is the first town in the area to allow residents to return. It was evacuated in March 2011 after the Fukushima plant was smashed by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami near Sendai, setting off the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Running for president is expensive and exhausting — but this year, some 22 people seem to think it's a good idea. There are five major candidates for the Democratic nomination and a whopping 17 on the Republican side.

But why? As it turns out, there are many reasons.

They Think They Have A Real Chance

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET

German police say that about 450 migrants from Hungary have arrived at a train station in Munich after German Chancellor Angela Merkel said her country would not limit the number of asylum seekers allowed in.

Thousands more arrived in Austria, many en route to Germany, after the Hungarian government blocked them from leaving the country by train earlier this week. In all, some 10,000 people are expected to reach Munich.

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In a dense, wooded lot, 17-year-old Justis Jackson lies on a mound of dirt. He doesn't seem to mind the sticky heat or buzzing mosquitoes. Jackson's attention is fixed on a buried object at the bottom of a neatly dug hole.

"Sounds like metal," he says, knocking. "But what type of metal and how old it is, I don't know. I hope it's old."

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Murders On The Rise In Major U.S. Cities

Sep 5, 2015

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Copyright 2017 WEKU. To see more, visit WEKU.

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It's one of those good news/bad news stories. A study in the medical journal The Lancet found that people around the world — in countries rich, poor and in the middle — are living longer. But here's the rub. You can't count on living those extra years in good health.

Chefs may now be celebrities, farmers our food heroes, and small-batch producers worthy of culinary canonization. Yet the workers who make up one of the largest groups in the American food system rarely get a mention: truckers.

"When you sit down to eat at the table, give a little thought to how this food got to your house. In most cases, it's been in the back of a trailer, driven for some distance by one of America's truckers," says Todd Dills, senior editor of Overdrive Magazine.

Funeral services were held Friday for slain Harris County Deputy Darren Goforth. He was shot to death a week ago as he pumped gas into his police car. Police called it "an unprovoked execution-style killing."

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET

More than 1,000 weary Syrian refugees were greeted with food and applause at the Austrian border after arriving by busloads from a long, chaotic journey through Hungary.

Some of the refugees had walked westward for hours on Friday after officials refused to let them board a train at a Budapest rail station. They had covered up to 30 miles on foot — about one third of the way to the border — before the Hungarian government supplied buses to carry them. Authorities in Germany and Austria agreed to accept them.

It was a sad day in Houston, as the family, friends and colleagues of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth attended his funeral Friday. In an apparent attempt to ease their grief, a couple who were at the gas station where Goforth was killed came forward Friday to tell the family that after he was attacked, they had sat with the deputy to wait for help.

Editor's Note: This report contains a racial slur.

A new play reveals some little-known history about the land that became New York City's Central Park: People used to live there.

Beginning in 1825, about 300 people — mainly free African-Americans — lived in a village that spanned a portion of the park's 843 acres in Manhattan, between 82nd and 89th streets, east of Central Park West. It was called Seneca Village.

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