Heather Wilson

This Ain't Your Parents' Civil Rights Movement

Reverend Osagyefo Sekou has been front and center in the ongoing protests in Ferguson since the shooting of Michael Brown and thinks the incident was the tipping point in the tense relationship between police and minorities. Sekou gives the annual Hibbert R. Roberts Lecture at Illinois State University Thursday night.
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Jimmy Katz

GLT Jazz Next: What A Saxophonist Learned From Keyboard Mentors

Tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander was a sideman for jazz greats including B3 master Charles Earland and pianist Harold Mabern. On this edition of GLT Jazz Next, Jon Norton talks with Alexander about Mabern, who he calls a mentor, the importance of learning on the bandstand, and about his early connection to central Illinois.
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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Football's popularity has made it among one of the most lucrative business franchises. So it should come as no surprise that the NFL and other organizations holding the broadcasting rights to games felt very strongly about Deadspin and SB Nation, popular sports publications, attracting readers by posting highlights on Twitter.

What came next were complaints of copyright violations. Then came Twitter's suspension of the accounts. Now comes the question: Do GIFs of sports highlights qualify as fair use?

Retroactivity sounds like a really boring legal subject. Until you learn that some 2,000 people serving terms of life without parole could have a shot at release if the Supreme Court rules that a 2012 decision is retroactive.

The FBI is investigating the death last year of a 32-year-old man in a Michigan jail.

In March 2014, David Stojcevski was sentenced to 30 days in the Macomb County jail.

He died there a little more than two weeks later — despite being under 24-hour video monitoring for most of that time.

That video footage captured nearly every minute of the physical and mental breakdown preceding his death.

For Dafinka Stojcevski, David's mother, the anger is still raw. She is seeking justice for her son.

Marlon James has won this year's Man Booker literary award for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings. James is the first Jamaican-born author to win the prestigious prize, which has only been open to writers outside the British Commonwealth for the past two years.

The Taliban announced Tuesday they have withdrawn from Kunduz, the northern Afghan city that briefly fell under insurgent control last month.

The Taliban said the reason for pulling out of the city was to protect against further civilian casualties, but there are multiple reports of battles continuing outside of the city. Kunduz is also the site of a U.S.-led airstrike that hit a Doctors Without Borders hospital and killed 22 civilians.

NPR's Tom Bowman tells our Newscast Unit, Kunduz was the first major provincial capital to fall under Taliban control in 14 years.

Transportation Leader Weighs In On Highway Funding

3 hours ago
Staff / Connect Transit

Speaking in Normal, the President and CEO of the American Public Transportation Association says he's confident Congress will agree on money for the Highway Trust Fund. Michael Melaniphy says it's an issue that Democrats and Republicans can support.

Authorization to spend money from the Highway Trust Fund will run out on October 29 if no action is taken. The deadline is a result of a three month extension passed last July.

On the topic of infrastructure, Melaniphy said about 15 other countries rate higher than the US.  

Earlier this month, Wal-Mart trumpeted that it had beaten a goal it set five years ago: to open at least 275 stores in food deserts by 2016. That targeted expansion into "neighborhoods without access to fresh affordable groceries" came as part of the retailer's "healthier food initiative," lauded by — and launched with — First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011.

The Minnesota dentist who killed Cecil the black-maned lion in Zimbabwe last summer, generating international outrage, won't face charges and can return to the country, government officials said.

Zimbabwe officials announced last summer that they would try to extradite Walter Palmer, the big-game hunter who killed Cecil in a bow-hunt, after allegedly paying $50,000 for the "privilege." But after reviewing the case, they decided Palmer hadn't broken any hunting laws.

Tonight, as you plop down on the couch to watch the Democratic presidential debate or the baseball playoffs, consider for a moment what you're waving your remote at. If you're like millions of Americans, your cable box sits on a shelf under your flat screen, gathering dust, easy to overlook.

It's also easy to overlook the rent you're paying for that box month after month.


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